Sunday, November 13, 2016

Charlotte Foraging #2 - American Persimmons (Diospyros virginiana)

I had a run in with an American persimmon a few years ago in late summer. Fool that I am I picked one off the tree, googled it on my iphone and discovered what it was. That's not too foolish but the foolish part was tasting it BEFORE reading farther to find out that this fruit has to be almost mushy and pulpy before eating. Needless to say I had a huge mouthful of dry. Drinking water was not helpful, I just went "Mmmmhh" for quite awhile. Ray enjoyed himself immensely at my expense. 

We saw large Asian persimmons while in Singapore fruit markets but the American cousin is way smaller. Because of the above adventure in foolish eating, I stayed away from them.


American Persimmons (not my photo)
Several weeks ago, I spotted a tree on the Greenway, took a photo and asked Marty, my brother-in-foraging, what it was. He said persimmon which immediately gave me flashbacks to my earlier experience.

But reading up on it, I discovered it's an old time American fruit that was very popular for desserts, puddings and jellies. It is not a cooperative fruit to work with. The time to gather them is after they have fallen off the tree and are ready to rot are allowed to ripen in a paper bag with an apple (my method of choice).



I patiently waited over two weeks with the paper bag getting in the way on the kitchen counter. Things started to get a bit mushy today so I thought I'd try pulping them and making a pie (recipe below). Some were really soft and mushy and the pulp was tasty but some were softening up but tasting these left me with that old dry mouth again. So back in the bag they went.


My 4 T of pulp
I did get to strain a dozen or so and got about 4T of pulp and a bunch of seeds. Somewhere I read that these seeds were used for buttons. It must have been during the time buttons were not readily available because I tried about 5 minutes to get one seed out of the pulp. Not a great use of time nowadays.


This is what the "buttons" look like.














Anyway, I will try to be patient and wait for the rest to ripen. Then I will try out the following pie recipe. Kind of sounds a little like a pumpkin pie.





PERSIMMON PIE

1 C persimmon pulp
2 eggs
1/4 Tsp salt
1 T butter, melted
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Mix ingredients and pour into a single pie crust. Bake for 10 minutes at 400 degrees. Turn oven down to 350 degrees and bake for an additional 30 minutes or until the center of the pie is firm.

Next up - bayberries.



Charlotte Foraging #1 - Part 2, still Chestnuts

I was hoping to try another batch of candied chestnuts or even Marty's soup recipe but I left my last batch of chestnuts still in their spiky covering on our patio. We went out of town for a few days and came back to chestnut husks scattered all over. I don't know how the squirrels or chipmunks can handle the spiky stuff but I figured "more power to them" if they really want them that badly.

I still have a bowlful that I hope to keep until Thanksgiving. But in the mean time here is the soup recipe Marty made. Really good:

Chestnut Soup
We had a lot of ideas about how to play around with this soup. Instead of brandy, you could use sherry or fruit brandy. You could add milk to give it some creaminess and lighten the color. You could garnish it with creme fraiche (as much as I love using Greek yogurt as a garnish, the creme fraiche would be just right in this particular case). Speaking of garnish, the chopped chestnuts that turn crispy from a quick saute are delicious, so don't skip that step!
Adapted from this recipe by Alex Urena for Food & Wine magazine

3 tablespoons canola oil
2 1/2 cups of roasted chestnuts
1 medium onion, minced
1 leek, white and tender green parts only, halved lengthwise and sliced 1/4 inch thick
2 teaspoons honey
4 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth (or vegetable broth)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon Cognac or brandy
1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Serves 4 as a first course

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add 7 of the chestnuts and cook until crisp and browned, stirring often [this take awhile]. Remove from pan and cool. Finely chop and set aside.

Add the onion and leeks to the pan, season with salt and pepper, and cook until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, about 8 minutes. Add the honey and stir well. Add the broth and remaining chestnuts, cover, and simmer 10 minutes.


Puree soup in a blender, working in batches. Taste for seasoning. May be covered and refrigerated at this point for 24 hours. To serve, return soup to the pot and reheat. Add the brandy or Cognac, and garnish with reserved chopped chestnuts and parsley.

Sunday, November 6, 2016

Charlotte Foraging #1: Chestnuts (Castanea dentata)

I've written posts about my shell and sea glass collecting, which I dearly love to do. Before we left for Singapore I was known to gather morels, bitter oranges, smooth river rocks, acorns, etc. Now that we are back in Charlotte, NC, and with my foraging buddy, Marty, we have been busy gathering for the winter, like all the squirrels around town. I thought I'd post a few of our adventures along with some recipes. 


Photo from Wikipedia
We are chestnut nuts, indeed. You have to be brave to gather chestnuts while still in their outer green spiky jackets. Nasty, nasty sharp - but you need get them before the critters do. Not sure what kind of heavy gloves they wear but they forage efficiently and quickly.

A lot of time and effort go into chestnut preparation, that's why they cost what they do in the grocery store. They put up a mighty fight all the way. Even with heavy leather gloves and long handled tongs we still got pinched and scratched.


From our initial batch Marty cooked up a great chestnut soup. The second batch went into a complex candying process. Two separate recipes and two different outcomes. See below for the combined recipe - the best of both worlds.


Leftovers still to be shelled.
Candied chestnuts after days of work. Yum.

CANDIED CHESTNUTS – THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS
(better known as "kestane şekeri" (kes-tahn-EH' sheh-keyr-EE' or Marrons Glacé).

INGREDIENTS

1 kilogram/2.5 pounds large, fresh chestnuts
5 cups sugar
5 cups water
1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional)

PREPARATION

Cut a shallow X in the flat side of each nut with a sharp knife – spread out nuts, cut side up, on a baking sheet. Bake in a preheated 425F degree oven for 15 minutes, turn nuts and bake for an additional 15 minutes. Let nuts cool and peal outer shell off carefully.

Place shelled chestnuts in a large pan with just enough water to cover them. Bring the water to a boil and cook the chestnuts for 10 minutes. After they have cooled, rub any additional thin skin off.

In another saucepan, combine the water, sugar and optional vanilla. Bring to a boil and stir constantly until the sugar melts. Add the peeled chestnuts and stir until the whole mixture returns to a boil. Continue cooking the chestnuts, frequently stirring, for 10 minutes.

Pour the candied chestnuts, along with the vanilla sugar syrup into a large container, and loosely cover it. Allow the chestnuts to soak in the syrup for 12 to 18 hours.

Add the chestnuts and syrup to a clean pan and repeat the process; this time boiling them for 2 minutes, and then soaking the mixture, loosely covered, for 18 to 24 hours.

Repeat the entire process a total of 3 to 4 times, until the sugar syrup has been absorbed by the chestnuts. Be patient, these steps are important.

Preheat an oven to 250F and arrange the candied chestnuts on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Place the baking sheet into the oven and turn off the heat. Allow the chestnuts to dry in the oven for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until they have firmed up and the surface of the nuts are dry. Store the chestnuts in an airtight tin. Enjoy!

Charlotte Foraging #2: Persimmons - coming soon...






Thursday, November 3, 2016

Travel Links - Updated

Pat and I have been back in the USA since September 9, spending most of our time settling back into Charlotte, NC. Part of our time has been spent looking for places to travel to over the next several years. It will be hard to top the last couple of years in Singapore, with trips to many other countries. Much of the search has included reviewing travel sites on the internet. The following is the list of sites I have bookmarked (please add comments, or send us emails, with additional suggestions: